Bhagavad Gita

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Bhagavad Gita

Postby Hermitas » Sun Jul 16, 2017 6:49 pm

I've been making my way through the Bhagavad Gita. I bought it a few years back but just couldn't connect with it. This time is different.

I'm fascinated by the fact that Krishna, Lord of Compassion, ...How to say it?

The scandal in the book seems intentional. "The God who is Compassion" also advises Arjuna to do battle and kill his enemy and ultimately reveals in a vision of his "Terrible Form" of Cosmic Devourer: "Now I am become Death. Destroyer of Worlds." Arjuna begs him to return to his previous form, the form he knew of Krishna (the Compassionate).

I love that these are here together. I love how the author presents the whole picture - or just... how it's viewpoint allows for more than the surface truth.
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Re: Bhagavad Gita

Postby seekinghga » Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:26 am

Did you know that Krishna is merely an avatar of Vishnu? That aughta spark some fire in the furnace of symbolism! :P

"Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, and the man that getteth understanding. For the merchandise of it is better than the merchandise of silver, and the gain thereof than fine gold. She is more precious than rubies: and all the things thou canst desire are not to be compared unto her. Length of days is in her right hand; and in her left hand riches and honour. Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace. She is a tree of life to them that lay hold upon her: and happy is every one that retaineth her."
"And they that read the book and debated thereon passed into the desolate land of Barren Words. And they that sealed up the book into their blood were the chosen of Adonai, and the Thought of Adonai was a Word and a Deed; and they abode in the Land that the far-off travellers call Naught."
- LXV 5:59
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Re: Bhagavad Gita

Postby Hermitas » Mon Jul 17, 2017 10:05 am

Yes, I'd read that, but it didn't click until you reminded me.

I could be very wrong. I know very, very little about the Hindu religions.

But I find it fascinating the way in which the author takes one of the three main gods and expands him into the All. It really spoke to me in terms of seeing each of the main three Hindu gods as initial or fundamental approaches to the All, incomplete in themselves, unless this stretch of understanding expands each of them into a face or mask of the All.

It really bridged a gap for me.
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Re: Bhagavad Gita

Postby seekinghga » Mon Jul 17, 2017 10:08 am

Hermitas wrote:Yes, I'd read that, but it didn't click until you reminded me.

I could be very wrong. I know very, very little about the Hindu religions.

But I find it fascinating the way in which the author takes one of the three main gods and expands him into the All. It really spoke to me in terms of seeing each of the main three Hindu gods as initial or fundamental approaches to the All, incomplete in themselves, unless this stretch of understanding expands each of them into a face or mask of the All.

It really bridged a gap for me.

Yeah, to the Shaivite Shiva is beheld as para-Brahman, etc., as you say. The utility of Advaitism is that it's easier to drop a single concept rather than a complex network of other such absurdities. Cool post.
Last edited by seekinghga on Sun Jul 23, 2017 6:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
"And they that read the book and debated thereon passed into the desolate land of Barren Words. And they that sealed up the book into their blood were the chosen of Adonai, and the Thought of Adonai was a Word and a Deed; and they abode in the Land that the far-off travellers call Naught."
- LXV 5:59
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Re: Bhagavad Gita

Postby Hermitas » Tue Jul 18, 2017 9:28 am

There is this recurring concept of "duty." In chapter one, Arjuna mentions "family duty" and "caste duty."

In chapter two, Krishna, encouraging Arjuna to war, says, "Know what your duty is and do it without hesitation. For the warrior, there is nothing better than a battle that duty enjoins." [translation by Stephen Mitchell]

In chapter six, Krishna says, "He who performs his duty with no concern for results is the true man of yoga - not he who refrains from action."

Chapter twelve, Krishna: "Those who realize the essence of duty, who trust me completely and surrender their lives to me - I love them with very great love."

I've only read through Chapter 12 so far, and I doubt those are the only references up to that point, but I was struck by how closely the Gita's concept of "duty" sounds like "true will." At least, it's described in similar ways.

Anybody familiar care to give their thoughts?
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Re: Bhagavad Gita

Postby Hermitas » Wed Jul 19, 2017 5:42 am

"duty" - "dharma"

Another translation of the above quote: "And even considering your personal dharma as well, it is not right for you to hesitate. There is nothing better for a warrior than a fight based on dharma.” (Bg. 2.31)

Here's a good link:

http://d6.krishna.com/dharma-bhagavad-gita
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